#292 – Durham Ranger Conversion

#292 Durham Ranger Conversion - Gary Fraser

#292 Durham Ranger Conversion – Gary Fraser

Tied by: Gary Fraser
Originated by: William Henderson (Original)

Hook: Mustad L87-3665A
Thread: White 8/0
Tag: Silver oval tinsel
Tip: Yellow floss
Tail: Golden pheasant crest
Butt: Black ostrich herl
Body: Orange floss on rear and black wool on front
Ribbing: Silver flat tinsel and silver oval tinsel, fine
Belly: Orange bucktail then black bucktail
Throat: Kingfisher blue hackle fivers
Wing: 2 orange hackles flanked by slightly shorter black hackle
Shoulder: Golden pheasant tippet
Eye: Jungle cock nail
Topping: Golden pheasant crest
Head: Black

Notes: The Durham Ranger is a beloved classic pattern designed by William Henderson in the 1840’s. The appearance of the full dressed fly is heavily influenced by the black and orange of the golden pheasant tippet used in the wing with just a whisper of contrasting blue. This colour is carried through to the body on both the classic and Gary’s conversion. Gary takes it a step farther, including the scheme in a two-toned belly to complete the look. The Durham Ranger was the first of a series of Ranger flies which have remained popular with the classic tying crowd.

Gary Fraser Gary Fraser – Born in Rural Cape Breton I had the luxury of growing up with some of the finest trout and salmon fishing in the world on my doorstep. I am a father of two, an avid outdoorsman, guide and owner of nsflyfishing.com a website used with other guides and anglers to promote fly fishing and fly tying here in Atlantic Canada. I have had little time on the water the last number of years with a young family and working away but things are coming together for a great 2012 season.
nsflyfishing.com
[visit Gary’s streamer page on Streamers 365]

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2 Responses to #292 – Durham Ranger Conversion

  1. Kelly L says:

    Lookin’ good!

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