#26-2013 – Gate Crasher tied by Bob Petti

#26-2013 Gate Crasher - Bob Petti
#26-2013 Gate Crasher – Bob Petti

Tied by: Bob Petti
Originated by: Mike Martinek Jr.

Hook: Unknown 4xl #6-#12
Thread: Black 6/0
Body: Copper twist or copper flat tinsel ribbed with copper oval tinsel
Throat: White hackle fibers
Wing: Orange bucktail under red bucktail under purple bucktail
Eye: White painted eye with black center
Head: Black

Notes: This is a vibrant little casting streamer that pays a high dividend in dark waters. The pattern was originally designed to be fished on the Kennebago River through pocket water. The fly was named after the “Grand” gate crasher, Ken Pelton of Portland, Maine. The original pattern was tied using either impala or polar bear hair, but bucktail or kip tail (calf tail) also work wonderfully.

Bob PettiBob Petti – Bob Petti is a fly fisherman and fly tyer from the Catskill Mountain region of New York. Like so many other fly tyers, he started his journey innocently. “All I wanted was the ability to tie the Royal Wulff, Elk Hair Caddis, Adams, and Gold Ribbed Hare’s Ear. I didn’t have much money and it wasn’t easy to buy flies at the time. Heck I couldn’t even afford a decent pair of waders back then, so I thought a small investment in tying flies would pay off in the long run.” A couple decades later his one-shoe-box hobby has grown to a full blown identity.
Bob on Global Fly Fisher
[visit Bob’s streamer page]

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10 Comments

  1. Bob, this is an incredible fly. I love everything about it. The colors, and that big gorgeous eye really make the fly. Outstanding work.

  2. Bob, great tie! I wish I could still tie flies that small, #6 is about as small as I can do decently anymore. Eyes are great! Did you use CD’s tools?
    Cheers

  3. Hi Darren – thread is black 6/0, not white (in case it matters). Original pattern description called for impala hair which must have been popular at some time, but obviously I used bucktail. I can’t say I’ve ever seen impala for sale. Great pattern, though. Lights up in the water. Great in those dark tannin stained rivers and streams.

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